Tuesday, September 27, 2011 Thursday, September 15, 2011 Monday, August 8, 2011
paletteofstrangeness:

Gluttony is the best sin.

This is something that Neil must see.

paletteofstrangeness:

Gluttony is the best sin.

This is something that Neil must see.

Tuesday, August 4, 2009
chuckolsen:
Health care needs good designers
I don’t really consider myself a straight-up designer anymore but I still champion this “Good Design Matters, Motherfuckers” mentality. I think this manifesto needs a pretty simple addition to express the basic reasoning of all the hardcore Illustrator jockeys out there: Let’s everyone just quit using design for evil if you want your road signs to continue pointing you in the right direction and your internet to continue being (relatively) legible. We own you. The Children of Meggs have spoken.

chuckolsen:

Health care needs good designers

I don’t really consider myself a straight-up designer anymore but I still champion this “Good Design Matters, Motherfuckers” mentality. I think this manifesto needs a pretty simple addition to express the basic reasoning of all the hardcore Illustrator jockeys out there: Let’s everyone just quit using design for evil if you want your road signs to continue pointing you in the right direction and your internet to continue being (relatively) legible. We own you. The Children of Meggs have spoken.

Saturday, August 1, 2009
allfacesweekend:


Striking and very unusual poster design for The Faces’ 1973 North American tour.  A section of the artwork was used on the subsequent live lp ‘Coast to Coast: Overture and Beginners’, long out of print.

Photo from rock-explosion.com. You can’t buy the poster, though. It’s SOLD.
—————
All Faces Weekend is a loosely-assembled celebration of England’s premiere boogie-rock band. Follow the AFW action here, read our unofficial manifesto or submit something.

allfacesweekend:

Striking and very unusual poster design for The Faces’ 1973 North American tour. A section of the artwork was used on the subsequent live lp ‘Coast to Coast: Overture and Beginners’, long out of print.

Photo from rock-explosion.com. You can’t buy the poster, though. It’s SOLD.

—————

All Faces Weekend is a loosely-assembled celebration of England’s premiere boogie-rock band. Follow the AFW action here, read our unofficial manifesto or submit something.

Tuesday, July 21, 2009 Thursday, July 16, 2009
soupsoup:

In response to the republican chart of Obama’s health care system, the chart above illustrates today’s health care system.

House Republicans today released a chart depicting what health care in America would look like if the House Democrats get their way. It’s confusing, if colorful—full of boxes, lines, and all sorts of hard-to-say acronyms. Which, of course, is the point.
If all of this sounds familiar, that’s because it is. The Republicans did the exact same thing in 1994, when President Bill Clinton unveiled his reform plan. That chart was, to be clear, relatively accurate. The Clinton plan really was very complicated. Just like the new plans moving through Congress.
But these charts—and, more important, the Republicans who use them as propoganda—tend to ignore one inconvenient fact: American health care is already complex. Ridiculously complex. Thanks to decades of haphazard, disorganized growth, it’s evolved into a mind-numbing web of institutions, agencies, businesses, and individual actors. And while that may be self-evident to anybody who’s ever had to deal with, say, a billing dispute between an insurer and hospital, it’s easy to lose sight of that when the discussion is all about what reform might do—rather than what health care would be like without it.
So just to make sure that fact isn’t lost, we’ve developed our own chart—a chart of American health care as it is today, in all of its convoluted glory.

Click here for full size.
(via catbus)

The one problem here: For all its convoluted glory, this chart is pretty well-designed, logical and friendly-looking. The Republicans’ chart is a dark and scary Powerpoint puke full of jarring colors, screaming type and mixed-up, confusing relationships. In fact, without considering the content of either, I think it’s way more successful than the above chart because it makes the proposed plan completely impenetrable and disorganized.

soupsoup:

In response to the republican chart of Obama’s health care system, the chart above illustrates today’s health care system.

House Republicans today released a chart depicting what health care in America would look like if the House Democrats get their way. It’s confusing, if colorful—full of boxes, lines, and all sorts of hard-to-say acronyms. Which, of course, is the point.

If all of this sounds familiar, that’s because it is. The Republicans did the exact same thing in 1994, when President Bill Clinton unveiled his reform plan. That chart was, to be clear, relatively accurate. The Clinton plan really was very complicated. Just like the new plans moving through Congress.

But these charts—and, more important, the Republicans who use them as propoganda—tend to ignore one inconvenient fact: American health care is already complex. Ridiculously complex. Thanks to decades of haphazard, disorganized growth, it’s evolved into a mind-numbing web of institutions, agencies, businesses, and individual actors. And while that may be self-evident to anybody who’s ever had to deal with, say, a billing dispute between an insurer and hospital, it’s easy to lose sight of that when the discussion is all about what reform might do—rather than what health care would be like without it.

So just to make sure that fact isn’t lost, we’ve developed our own chart—a chart of American health care as it is today, in all of its convoluted glory.

Click here for full size.

(via catbus)

The one problem here: For all its convoluted glory, this chart is pretty well-designed, logical and friendly-looking. The Republicans’ chart is a dark and scary Powerpoint puke full of jarring colors, screaming type and mixed-up, confusing relationships. In fact, without considering the content of either, I think it’s way more successful than the above chart because it makes the proposed plan completely impenetrable and disorganized.

Thursday, April 30, 2009 Tuesday, April 14, 2009